Tag: ssh

How To : Set up a FTPS (FTP over SSL) Server on Linux ~ Your Own Linux..!

FTP is a standardized network protocol and probably the quickest as well as easiest option available when a large chunk of data is to be transferred, from one host to another, over a TCP-based network. FTP defines a client-server architecture which uses two separate ‘well-known’ ports, for data (port no. 20, used for data transfer) and control (port no. 21, used for authentication) connections, in order to establish connectivity between the server and the client.

Source: How To : Set up a FTPS (FTP over SSL) Server on Linux ~ Your Own Linux..!

Link: How to access a Linux server behind NAT via reverse SSH tunnel

You are running a Linux server at home, which is behind a NAT router or restrictive firewall. Now you want to SSH to the home server while you are away from home. How would you set that up? SSH port forwarding will certainly be an option. However, port forwarding can become tricky if you are dealing with multiple nested NAT environment. Besides, it can be interfered with under various ISP-specific conditions, such as restrictive ISP firewalls which block forwarded ports, or carrier-grade NAT which shares IPv4 addresses among users.

What is Reverse SSH Tunneling?

One alternative to SSH port forwarding is reverse SSH tunneling. …..

Full article here:
How to access a Linux server behind NAT via reverse SSH tunnel (Xmodulo)

Link: Linux Troubleshooting: How To Keep A Process Running After Putty Or SSH Session Closed?

Mostly, I use SSH command to connect to my remote server. Unfortunately, today the power is gone and the Ethernet hub is turned off, so my SSH session was lost. What do you do if an important task is going on after losing your SSH session? Here is the simple tool called Tmux to keep a process running  after the SSH or Putty session lost.

Full article here:
Linux Troubleshooting: How To Keep A Process Running After Putty Or SSH Session Closed? (Unixmen)

Link: Security in Three Ds: Detect, Decide and Deny (using DenyHosts to stop brute-force SSH attacks)

Whenever a server is accessible via the Internet, it’s a safe bet that hackers will be trying to access it. Just look at the SSH logs for any server you use, and you’ll surely find lots of “authentication failure” lines, originating from IPs that have nothing to do with you or your business. Brute-force attempts (such as “dictionary attacks”) try different passwords over and over to try to get into your box, and there’s always a chance that they eventually will succeed. Thus, it’s a good idea to apply these “three Ds” for your security: detect intruder attempts, decide when they’ve gone “over the top” (past what would be acceptable for honest-to-goodness typing mistakes), and deny them access at least for a (longish!) while.

Several tools manage this kind of monitoring (see the Resources section). In this article, I describe installing, configuring and running DenyHosts. With it, you’ll have a running background dæmon that will check your system continuously for access attempts, decide if they look unsafe, block them and inform you. DenyHosts even can be configured to share information with other servers, so whenever a hacker is detected on one system, it will be blocked on other systems too.

Full article here:
Security in Three Ds: Detect, Decide and Deny (Linux Journal)

Link: Set Up SSH Tunneling on a Linux / Unix / BSD Server To Bypass NAT

I’m a new Linux / Unix system user. How can I set encrypted tunnel between my desktop/laptop computer and server in a remote data center to bypass the limits in a network? How do I create a reverse SSH tunnel on Unix-like systems?

SSH tunnelling can be thought as a poor-man’s-VPN. It is handy in situations where you would like to hide your traffic from any body who might be listening on the wire or eavesdropping. You can use such tunnel between your computer and your Unix/BSD/Linux server to bypass limits placed by a network or to bypass NAT, and more.

Full article here:
Set Up SSH Tunneling on a Linux / Unix / BSD Server To Bypass NAT (nixCraft)

Link: Configure “No Password SSH Keys Authentication” with PuTTY on Linux Servers

SSH (Secure SHELL) is one of the most used network protocol to connect and login to remote Linux servers, due to its increased security provided by its cryptographic secure channel established for data flow over insecure networks and its Public Key Authentication.

While using passwords to login to remote servers can provide a less secure to system security, because a password can be brute-force cracked, SSH Public Key Authentication provides the best secure method to perform distance logins, because it’s almost impossible to decipher the key and the private key guarantees that the sender it’s always who it claims to be.

This article will show you how you can generate and use SSH Keys from Windows based platforms using Putty client to automatically perform remote logins on Linux servers without the need to enter passwords.

Full article here:
Configure “No Password SSH Keys Authentication” with PuTTY on Linux Servers (Tecmint)

Link: A Pocket Guide for Linux ssh Command with Examples

If you have been in the IT world for quite some time you probably have heard about SSH, how great a tool it is and all its cool security features. In this tutorial you will learn how to use SSH in a few minutes and login to your remote computers seamlessly and securely.

If you have no clue what SSH is you can visit Wikipedia before proceeding.

Full article here:
A Pocket Guide for Linux ssh Command with Examples (LinOxide)

Link: KeyBox: A Web-based SSH Console To Manage Multiple SSH Sessions Simultaneously

KeyBox is a free, web-based open source application that can be used to manage multiple SSH sessions on multiple systems. It allows you to execute commands on multiple shells, manage keys, share terminal commands, and upload files to multiple systems simultaneously. It will generate a private/public key pair on initial startup, also you can define your own custom key if you like. Moreover, you can add additional system admins, and audit terminal history of them. KeyBox allows you to control the users, so that you can define which users can access which systems. After starting the SSH session, you’ll be able to manage single or multiple systems via a web browser of your choice more easily and effectively.

This tutorial describes how to install KeyBox on your Linux systems, and how to manage multiple remote servers through KeyBox web console.

Full article here:
KeyBox: A Web-based SSH Console To Manage Multiple SSH Sessions Simultaneously (Unixmen)

Link: Installing OpenSSH on Windows 7

Today, I was tempted to take control of a Windows machine remotely in console mode as I’m trying to script the launch and use of VLC. A quick Google search reveleaed the existence of the sshwindows project which is a more lightweight solution than a full cygwin installation.

Here are the installation steps :

Full article here:
Installing OpenSSH on Windows 7 (World Gone Web)

Link: Easily Manage / Connect To SSH Hosts With Guake Indicator

Guake Indicator is an Ubuntu AppIndicator for Guake terminal users, useful for those who need to connect to multiple SSH hosts frequently: the indicator lets you easily manage your favorite SSH hosts and establish new SSH connections via Guake.

Full article here:
Easily Manage / Connect To SSH Hosts With Guake Indicator (Web Upd8)

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