Tag: Samba

If your mount.cifs has stopped working, try adding -o vers=3.0

If you have been using “mount.cifs …” or “sudo mount.cifs …” to mount a share located on a Windows machine in Linux, and it stops working after any kind of update or change to your network, try adding -o vers=3.0, or if you are already using some -o options, add vers=3.0 to the list (separated from any existing -o options by a comma). You could also try 2.0 rather than 3.0, but by default it tries to use 1.0 as the SMB protocol version, and Microsoft has removed support for that in some versions of Windows. So if you get a Windows upgrade that removes the 1.0 protocol, your existing mount-cifs invocation line may stop working, but it appears that sometimes other changes in the network can trigger this as well. The vers= option is explained on the mount.cifs man page as follows:

SMB protocol version. Allowed values are:

  • 1.0 – The classic CIFS/SMBv1 protocol. This is the default.
  • 2.0 – The SMBv2.002 protocol. This was initially introduced in Windows Vista Service Pack 1, and Windows Server 2008. Note that the initial release version of Windows Vista spoke a slightly different dialect
    (2.000) that is not supported.
  • 2.1 – The SMBv2.1 protocol that was introduced in Microsoft Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008R2.
  • 3.0 – The SMBv3.0 protocol that was introduced in Microsoft Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012.

Note too that while this option governs the protocol version used, not all features of each version are available.

So, a typical invocation to mount a Windows share accessible by all users of the machine might now look something like this:

sudo mount.cifs //WindowsIPaddress/WindowsShareName /path/to/mountpoint/ -o user=WindowsUserName,password=WindowsUserPassword,vers=3.0,uid=1000,gid=1000

(The bolded part above is all one line.)

How to set up a Samba file server to use with Windows clients – Xmodulo

According to the Samba project web site, Samba is an open source/free software suite that provides seamless file and print services to SMB/CIFS clients. Unlike other implementations of the SMB/CIFS networking protocol (such as LM Server for HP-UX, LAN Server for OS/2, or VisionFS), Samba (along with its source code) is freely available (at no cost to the end user), and allows for interoperability between Linux/Unix servers and Windows/Unix/Linux clients.

For these reasons, Samba is the preferred solution for a file server in networks where different operating systems (other than Linux) coexist – the most common setup being the case of multiple Microsoft Windows clients accessing a Linux server where Samba is installed, which is the situation we are going to deal with in this article.

Source: How to set up a Samba file server to use with Windows clients – Xmodulo

Link: Introduction to Samba – Share Files and Directories between Linux, Windows and Mac

Samba is the most popular and efficient way with which you can share your files and directories between Linux, Windows and Mac. You just have to create a Samba user, Decide which file/directory you wish to share and Set the permissions, in order to create a Samba share. Well, initially, this might seem to be difficult- especially for beginners, but when you understand all the configuration options, it will seem to be as simple as anything.

This tutorial will explain how to share files and directories on Linux with Windows and Mac clients.

Full article here:
Introduction to Samba – Share Files and Directories between Linux, Windows and Mac (Your Own Linux..!)

Link: How to Set up Samba Server for Windows, Linux and OS X File Sharing on Raspberry Pi

Samba is re-implementation of the SMB/CIFS networking protocol, samba provides cross-platform file and print services sharing for various Microsoft Windows, OS X and Linux file sharing.

Full article here:
How to Set up Samba Server for Windows, Linux and OS X File Sharing on Raspberry Pi (Tech Rapid)

Link: Create Safe & Easy Shares Using Samba For Windows Machines

In the past I shared howto create samba share between Windows and Linux machines so both can read/write, and also shared a program called Nitroshare which allows to send/receive files between Linux/Mac/Windows without any complicated configurations. So this time I came up with another secure and easy method to share your data with network Windows machines (for specific users). If you are a beginner and not really familiar with Linux command line interface then Samba GUI can help you with this matter. So lets start…

Full article here:
Create Safe & Easy Shares Using Samba For Windows Machines (NoobsLab)
Related:
Samba – A short guide for sharing files and printers (Free and Open Source Software Knowledge Base)

Featured Article:

Recent Posts

Recent Comments

Archives

Categories

Meta

GiottoPress by Enrique Chavez

%d bloggers like this: