Category: VPN

How To Create A VPN Killswitch Using Iptables on Linux

Use iptables to create a VPN killswitch to protect against data leaks.

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If you’re connected to a VPN, you need a killswitch. No, it’s not as metal as it sounds. It’s just a mechanism that stops your Internet connection when you’re disconnected from the VPN. It protects you from inadvertently leaking sensitive information onto the Internet when the VPN connection drops.

Source: How To Create A VPN Killswitch Using Iptables on Linux – LinuxConfig.org

How To Set Up an OpenVPN Server on Ubuntu 18.04

OpenVPN is a full-featured, open-source Secure Socket Layer (SSL) VPN solution that accommodates a wide range of configurations. In this tutorial, you will set up an OpenVPN server on an Ubuntu 18.04 server and then configure access to it from Windows, macOS, iOS and/or Android. This tutorial will keep the installation and configuration steps as simple as possible for each of these setups.

Source: How To Set Up an OpenVPN Server on Ubuntu 18.04 | DigitalOcean

Link: OpenVPN-Setup: Shell script to set up Raspberry Pi (TM) as an OpenVPN server

About

Shell script to set up Raspberry Pi (TM) as a VPN server using the free, open-source OpenVPN software. Includes templates of the necessary configuration files for easy editing, as well as a script for easily generating client .ovpn profiles after setting up the server. Based on the ReadWrite tutorial ‘Building A Raspberry Pi VPN’ by Lauren Orsini (see sources 1 and 2 at the bottom of this Readme).

To follow this guide, you will need to have a Raspberry Pi Model B or later (so long as it has an ethernet port), an SD or microSD card (depending on the model) with Raspbian installed, a power adapter appropriate to the power needs of your model, and an ethernet cable to connect your Pi to your router or gateway. You will also need to setup your Pi with a static IP address (see either source 3 or 4) and have your router forward port 1194 (varies by model & manufacturer; consult your router manufacturer’s documentation to do this). You should also find your Pi’s local IP address on your network and the public IP address of your network and write them down before beginning. Enabling SSH on your Pi is also highly recommended, so that you can run a very compact headless server without a monitor or keyboard and be able to access it even more conveniently (This is also covered by source 4). And last but not least, be sure to change your user password from the default.

Full documentation and download here:
OpenVPN-Setup (GitHub)
Discussion in this Reddit thread

Link: How to install an Opensource VPN Server on Linux

One of the most concerning factors to me while browsing, Is how can I ensure that my data remains private and secure ? While searching for answers, I came cross a number of ways in which you can remain anonymous like using a proxy website. But still using a third party service was not assuring enough. What I needed was a software which could be installed and run by me thus ensuring that I and only I would have access to the data.

So what is such a software called?

It’s called a VPN service or short for Virtual Private Network. It allows you to encrypt your data via SSL when you connect through it. Since the connection is encrypted even your ISP cannot see what your browsing.

In this Linux Tutorial , I will be installing an OpenVPN Access Server on CentOS 7 . OpenVPN is easy to use, OpenSource and has community based support. It has clients for Windows, Android, and Mac.

Full article here:
How to install an Opensource VPN Server on Linux (techarena51.com)

Links: The DIY home VPN experiment series

Part One: Introduction

It’s been a while since my last blog entry, and I’ve decided to catch you up on some of the projects that I’ve been working on in my home lab. This next series of posts is going to revolve around the do-it-yourself home VPN.

What is a VPN, or virtual private network?

“A VPN is a communications environment in which access is controlled to permit peer connections only within a defined community of interest, and is constructed though some form of partitioning of a common underlying communications medium, where this underlying communications medium provides services to the network on a nonexclusive basis [1].”

In essence, a VPN is private and controlled network communication over a non-private medium – the Internet.

Full articles here (source: empiric virtualization):
Introduction.
Generating a PKI (Public Key Infrastructure) for my OpenVPN.
My Virtualized OpenVPN Server.
Deploying OpenVPN using CentOS on a Raspberry Pi.

Link: How To Setup a VPN in Ubuntu using OpenVPN

We love Linux and we love it for its open source nature, security, and powerful tools. There are a lot of free as well as commercial VPN solutions available for Ubuntu. We are not going to list or rank all the top VPN providers. We don’t necessarily want to rank them simply because users choose their VPN provider based on their personal requirements. If you want an US VPN service, you should look for the best US VPN service that supports OpenVPN. The intent of the article is to help newbies configure and use their favorite VPN service without going back and forth in Ubuntu community forum and embarrass oneself before the rather patronizing users.

Full article here:
How To Setup a VPN in Ubuntu using OpenVPN (Linuxaria)

Link: How to Setup a VPN (PPTP) Server on Debian Linux

VPN-ing into your server will allow you to connect to every possible service running on it, as if you were sitting next to it on the same network, without individually forwarding every port combination for every service you would like to access remotely.

Using a VPN connection also has the upshot of, if desired, granting access to other computers on the network as if you where in it locally from anywhere across the internet.

While not the most secure of the VPN solutions out there, PPTP is by far the simplest to install, configure and connect to from any modern system and from windows specifically as the client is a part of the OS since the XP days and you don’t need to mess with certificates (like with L2TP+IPsec or SSL VPNs) on both sides of the connection.

Did i get you interested? then let’s go 🙂

Full article here:
How to Setup a VPN (PPTP) Server on Debian Linux

Link: DSVR (Domain-Specific VPN Router)

[notice]This software may not be legal to use in some countries or localities, or for certain uses.  We are not lawyers, so we cannot advise you on this.[/notice]

From the README.md file:

PURPOSE

If you’re using a VPN service today, you may have found the following limitations:

1) All or nothing. Either ALL traffic goes down the VPN or none – unable to be selective.
2) Only one VPN at a time. Cannot selectively route certain sites down one VPN, and others down another VPN.
3) Unless you’ve configured your VPN at the router level, it’s likely that only a single device can use your VPN at one time.

This project serves to address each of the above – see the FEATURES section.

Please review my blog post here http://darranboyd.wordpress.com/2013/07/05/selective-vpn-routing-solution-dsvr/

Note that this software runs on a Raspberry Pi. Full text and download links:
DSVR (Domain-Specific VPN Router) (GitHub)

If for some reason you don’t want to run this on a Raspberry Pi, but would instead prefer to do something similar using a DD-WRT based router, the same author covered that topic a couple of years ago:
StrongVPN PPTP on DD-WRT – Source based routing (improved) (Darran Boyd)

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