Tag Archives: system backup

Cronopete – An Apple Time Machine Clone For Linux

If you use Mac OS, you certainly have known about or used Time machine. It is a backup software application distributed with the Apple’s Mac OS X. It is used to backup your data to an external drive, so that you can restore them later from the backup. If you are a fan boy/girl of Time Machine, you need to check out “Cronopete”. It is the clone of Time Machine for Linux operating systems. Using Cronopete, we can easily create periodic backups of a Linux system. It supports popular Linux distributions, including Arch Linux, Debian, Fedora, and Ubuntu.

In this brief guide, we are going to see how to install and use Cronopete in Linux to backup and restore data.

Source: Cronopete – An Apple’s Time Machine Clone For Linux – OSTechNix
Related link: Easy Linux backup software with Time Machine like functionality | Nuxified.org

Easy Linux backup software with Time Machine like functionality | Nuxified.org

It’s easy to be impressed by Apple’s Time Machine backup feature. It works in the background, is seamlessly integrated, and when you need to get to restore something whoa.. you’re all of a sudden in space, travelling back in time, bringing something back to the present.

There are two key things to this system. First it’s an incremental backup system which allows you to restore from multiple past versions of files that are backed up (the “time travelling”). Second, it’s very easy to use and provides a very impressive experience.

So do we have anything like that in the Linux world? Well, for the most part we do, and here’s what we’ve got.

Source: Easy Linux backup software with Time Machine like functionality | Nuxified.org
Related link: Cronopete – An Apple’s Time Machine Clone For Linux – OSTechNix

NOTE: The link to Rastersoft’s Cronopete seems to have gone missing from the article. Here it is.

How to Clone/Backup Linux Systems Using – Mondo Rescue Disaster Recovery Tool

Mondo Rescue is an open source, free disaster recovery utility that allows you to easily create complete Linux clone to CD, DVD, Tape, USD devices, hard disk,

Source: How to Clone/Backup Linux Systems Using – Mondo Rescue Disaster Recovery Tool (Tecmint)

Link: DD Utility – Easily Backup and Restore Disk Image Files In Ubuntu

The legacy DD is a command line utility for UNIX like operating systems. DD stands for Data Description and the utility empowers the user to copy and convert files but it is a command line utility without any Graphical User Interface (GUI). DD utility can copy and convert simple files, device drivers (e.g for CD ROM, LAN, Speakers, HDD etc) and can access boot sector information that is why it can be used to prepare bootable backup and restore images. It performs the conversions to and from ASCII to EBCDIC, furthermore, it performs the byte order swapping as well. The name of the utility i.e DD seems to have been extracted from IBM’s Job Control Language (JCL) where it appears in a number of command statements.

This article is about a variant of DD command line utility with Graphical User Interface (GUI) i.e dd Utility. It is partially cross platform that is it works on UNIX like operating  Linux Ubuntu and Apple’s Mac OS X.

Full article here:
DD Utility – Easily Backup and Restore Disk Image Files In Ubuntu (LinOxide)

Link: DIY Time Capsule with a Raspberry Pi

As a Mac user I’ve always used Time Machine for local backups. The only issue is that it requires plugging a drive directly into your machine or buying an Apple Time Capsule. At $200 – $400 that’s not a cheap option for NAS backups.

So I set out to create my own DIY Time Capsule using a 3TB Hard Drive and a Raspberry Pi. Below are the steps I went through to get things setup.

Note: I always recommend having multiple backup sources and because this setup requires mimicking Apple protocol there is potential for data loss. Use at your own risk.

Full article here:
DIY Time Capsule with a Raspberry Pi (Caleb Woods)

Link: Time Machine for every Unix out there

rsync is one of the tools that have gradually infiltrated my day to day tool-box (aside Vim and Zsh).

Using rsync it’s very easy to mimic Mac OS X new feature called Time Machine. In this article I’ll show how to do it, but there is still a nice GUI missing – for those who like it shiny.

Full articles by Michael Jakl here:
Time Machine for every Unix out there
Followup article:
Addendum to “Time Machine for every Unix out there”

These articles are “oldie but goodies” from 2007 – if you know of a better way, leave a comment!

Link: Did You Know Windows 8 Has a Built-In Time Machine Backup?

We sometimes forget with all the focus on Windows 8′s new “Modern” interface, but Windows 8 has a variety of great desktop improvements. One of them is File History, a built-in backup feature that functions similarly to Apple’s much-loved Time Machine. Enable the Windows 8 “time machine” File History, and Windows will automatically back up your files to an external or network drive. You’ll be able to restore previous versions from these backups, whether you’ve deleted a file or you just want to recover an old version of a file.

Full article here:
Did You Know Windows 8 Has a Built-In Time Machine Backup? (MakeUseOf)

Still using Windows 7? Nothing so simple for you, but check out this video: