Tag: ssh

Link: Run Automated Scripts Over SSH

We’ve shown you how to use SSH to transfer files securely. But there’s a major issue with SSH’s default behaviour. You are only connected with the remote machine after you’ve manually entered the password which rules it out for any tasks you want to run unattended. Or does it?

Here’s a quick lowdown on how the OpenSSH CLI tools (scp and sftp) work so that you can better appreciate the issue. When you want to copy over files to or from the remote host, you can use scp which automatically initiates a SSH connection to the remote host. Every time you run a scp command it establishes a new connection to the remote. So if you have multiple scp commands you’d be entering the same password several times.

This is why you wouldn’t want to use scp in any scripts you want to run unattended. There’s also the fact that if you have multiple accounts on several machines on the network, you’d have trouble memorizing unique, strong passwords for each.

To overcome this problem, you need to switch OpenSSH’s default authentication mechanism to a key-based system.

Full article here:
Run Automated Scripts Over SSH (Make Tech Easier)

Link: Debian and Ubuntu Linux: Set openssh SeverKeyBits to 1024

The upstream openssh project sets the value ServerKeyBits to 1024, but Debian and Ubuntu currently unfortunately have a lower security setting of 768 bits. I’ve filed a bug to fix this. In the meantime, here is how to make that change now!

Full article here:
Debian and Ubuntu Linux: Set openssh SeverKeyBits to 1024 (scottlinux.com)

Link: How To Protect SSH with fail2ban on Debian 7

Having a server or computer connected to a network comes with a certain amount of risk. Any machine, including a VPS, connected to the internet is a potential target for malicious attacks.

While having a well-configured firewall will prevent many kinds of illegitimate access, you still need to open up certain services to allow yourself the ability to log in and administer the server. SSH is the service most commonly used to log into remote systems, and so it also is one of the most frequently targeted.

Fortunately, there is a tool available that can mitigate this attack vector, called fail2ban. This can be configured to allow legitimate logins using SSH, but ban IP addresses after they have failed to authenticate correctly after a set number of times.

Full article here:
How To Protect SSH with fail2ban on Debian 7 (DigitalOcean)

Link: Shell In A Box – A Web-Based SSH Terminal to Access Remote Linux Servers

Shell In A Box (pronounced as shellinabox) is a web based terminal emulator created by Markus Gutschke. It has built-in web server that runs as a web-based SSH client on a specified port and prompt you a web terminal emulator to access and control your Linux Server SSH Shell remotely using any AJAX/JavaScript and CSS enabled browsers without the need of any additional browser plugins such as FireSSH.

In this tutorial, I describe how to install Shellinabox and access remote SSH terminal using a modern web browser on any machine. Web-based SSH is very useful when you are protected with firewall and only HTTP(s) traffic can get through.

Full article here:
Shell In A Box – A Web-Based SSH Terminal to Access Remote Linux Servers (TecMint)

Link: VNC and SSH on Raspberry Pi Without Display

Here is a small walk through of how to install SSH and VNC on Raspberry Pi…

What is SSH? I really did not know the abbreviation until I googled it. It stands for “Secure Shell”. To be brief, with SSH connection between RPI and another computer, you can access the terminal prompt of RPI from the other computer (say your PC). Thus you will be able to execute commands remotely for the RPi from your PC without the need for a keyboard and mouse.

What is VNC? Virtual Network Computer. It is just like team viewer or any other remote desktop stuff, with which you can see your RPi’s desktop on your PCs screen, enabling GUI based access of RPI.

Assuming that you have an SSH enabled RPI, the tutorial follows.

Full article here:
VNC and SSH on Raspberry Pi Without Display (rajvigneshtn.weebly.com)
Related article:
VNC, SSH and HDMI: Three Options for Viewing Your Raspberry Pi (MakeUseOf)

Link: How to access ssh terminal in web browser on Linux

Running “everything” in a web browser used to be a bold statement. However, due to the increasingly powerful HTML5/JavaScript stack, a web browser has now become a dominant application delivery platform. Even the Linux kernel sandboxed in a web browser no longer sounds so crazy these days.

In this tutorial, I describe how to access an SSH terminal in a web browser on Linux. Web-based SSH is useful when the firewall you are behind is so restrictive that only HTTP(s) traffic can get through.

Full article here:
How to access ssh terminal in web browser on Linux (Xmodulo)

Link: MythWeb ssh tunnel howto [for MythTV users]

I am going to briefly describe how to connect to mythweb that is behind a firewall in a router. I will assume you have mythweb running. If you need help with that please see the mythweb documentation: http://www.mythtv.org/docs/ I will also assume that you know how to forward ports on your router. …..

Full article here:
MythWeb ssh tunnel howto (MythTV wiki)

Link: How to Really Secure Your Linux VPS SSH Service (also works for non-VPS environments)

Let face it, the Secure Shell (SSH) daemon running on your VPS is the most sensitive service open to attack on your system. Any hacker worth their salt will first try to gain access to your VPS via SSH and 99.9% of all VPS connected to the internet run this service by default and on their public IP.

If somebody gains access to your VPS via the SSH service, you can kiss your data and entire VPS goodbye. This is the ultimate goal for any would-be hacker and as such, needs to be the first thing you secure as a VPS administrator.

In this article I’m going to show you how to take three simple precautions with the SSH service that will stop most hackers and script kiddies in their tracks.

Full article here:
How to Really Secure Your Linux VPS SSH Service (Linuxaria)

Note that while the article and title makes reference to a Virtual Private Server (VPN), there is no reason these techniques would not work with any version of Linux that offers SSH access.

Link: Automatically restart SSH sessions and tunnels Using Autossh

autossh is a program to start a copy of ssh and monitor it, restarting it as necessary should it die or stop passing traffic.

Automatically restart SSH sessions and tunnels Using Autossh (Ubuntu Geek)

Useful SSH How-Tos

These are from an interesting site called Make Tech Easier, listed in order from oldest to newest:

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