Month: October 2014

Link: Debian-goodies: A must-have Set of Utilities For Debian/Ubuntu Administrators

Are you a Debian/Ubuntu Administrator or a regular user, then you may use the dpkg and APT commands often. These commands are used to install, remove, update or upgrade a package or the whole system. Mostly, we use the above two tools only for our day to day operations, But believe me, there are many useful commands are exist that most users aware of.

If you want to know which packages occupy the most disk space, or which package might have broken another, or to get a most recent version of a package, or just to get a particular version of a package, then you probably need Debian-goodies.

Full article here:
Debian-goodies: A must-have Set of Utilities For Debian/Ubuntu Administrators (Unixmen)

Link: 5 ‘chattr’ Commands to Make Important Files IMMUTABLE (Unchangeable) in Linux

chattr (Change Attribute) is a command line Linux utility that is used to set/unset certain attributes to a file in Linux system to secure accidental deletion or modification of important files and folders, even though you are logged in as a root user.

In Linux native filesystems i.e. ext2, ext3, ext4, btrfs, etc. supports all the flags, though all the flags won’t support to all non-native FS. One cannot delete or modify file/folder once attributes are sets with chattr command, even though one have full permissions on it.

Full article here:
5 ‘chattr’ Commands to Make Important Files IMMUTABLE (Unchangeable) in Linux (Tecmint)

Link: rsync Command to Exclude a List of Files and Directories in Linux

rsync is a very useful and popular linux tool being used for backup and restoring files, but also for comparing and syncing them. We already shown you in the past how to use rsync command in linux with examples and today we will add a few more useful tricks you can use rsync at.

Full article here:
rsync Command to Exclude a List of Files and Directories in Linux (LinOxide)

Link: Unchecky – A Freeware to Avoid Installing Junkware in Windows

It’s an annoying fact that some Windows freeware is bundled with terrible toolbars and sneaky software that does nothing but harm your system or your personal data. The worst thing is that getting rid of this junkware or crapware is a pain in the neck. If you are always facing this junkware problem, Unchecky is a useful freeware that can help you avoid unwanted junkware installations.

Full article here:
Unchecky – A Freeware to Avoid Installing Junkware in Windows (Make Tech Easier)

Link: Discourse [forum software review]

….. Although forum software often is reasonable, it doesn’t make me go, “wow”.  …..  So, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that when Jeff Atwood, cofounder of Stack Exchange and the author of the famous “Coding Horror” blog, announced he was going to make better Web-based forum software, I personally reacted with a shrug. After all, I’ve used and seen forum software for years. How much different or better could it be?

Well, I can report to you that even though Discourse, Atwood’s open-source forum software, is still somewhat unfinished, it already is head and shoulders above other forums I have used, as both a user and an administrator. The fact that it is open source, based on Ruby, PostgreSQL and Ember.js is icing on the cake, making what already was excellent software even better. …..

Full article here:
Discourse (Linux Journal)

Link: How To Disable Unity Online Search Feature On Ubuntu 14.10

What Is Unity Online Search Feature?

The Unity search function in Ubuntu operating system is provided by Canonical Ltd. When you enter a search term into the dash, Ubuntu will search your computer and will record the search terms locally. Unless you have opted out, the search terms will be sent to productsearch.ubuntu.com link and selected third parties including Facebook, Twitter, BBC, and Amazon. Canonical and these selected third parties will collect your search terms and use them to provide you with search results while using Ubuntu.

Full article here:
How To Disable Unity Online Search Feature On Ubuntu 14.10 (Unixmen)

Link: 5 Dropbox Alternatives for Linux

These days there are dozens of personal “cloud storage” services. The most popular is Dropbox. A lot of people are happy with Dropbox; some are not. It’s not a terrible service, but it’s not for everyone. For whatever reason, finding an equivalent to the service is challenging. The reason? Not a lot of mainstream services offer a Linux client, so you’ll have to do a bit of digging. Luckily, we’ve compiled a list of the best Linux friendly alternatives to Dropbox to make your life easier! Check it out!

Full article here:
5 Dropbox Alternatives for Linux (Make Tech Easier)

Link: Duplicati – An Open Source Powerful Free Backup Tool

Duplicati is an open source free backup program that creates backups with the ability to store them securely encrypted, incremental and compressed on cloud storage services and remote file servers. At the moment it has the ability to work with Amazon S3, Windows SkyDrive, Google Drive, Tahoe LAFS, Rackspace Cloud or it can use your own SSH, WebDAV, SFTP or FTP file server.

Full article here:
Duplicati – An Open Source Powerful Free Backup Tool (LinOxide)

Link: Finding Orphaned Packages Using Deborphan And Rpmorphan

Are you troubling with full of unused packages that occupies more space and slow down your operating system performance? Well, you should try these two awesome utilities that help will you to easily find and remove the orphaned packages on your hard drive.

Well, What is an Orphaned package? Simple, Orphaned package is an unwanted package which is no longer necessary. As you may know, whenever you install a package, it will install along with other packages(dependencies). After removing the package, not all the dependencies will be removed completely. Some dependencies might still exist and dumbs the hard drive space after removing a specified package.

In this tutorial, We will discuss how to find and remove the orphaned files in Debian, and RHEL based systems.

Full article here:
Finding Orphaned Packages Using Deborphan And Rpmorphan (Unixmen)

Link: Reduce amount reserved free disk space with tune2fs

In Ubuntu/Debian by default while creating ext2/ext3/ext4 file system 5% of disk space is reserved for super user across each partition.

Except for root partition 5% reserved space is not required for other partitions. So we reuse that reserved space.

Full article here:
Reduce amount reserved free disk space with tune2fs (Sany’s Linux and Open Source Blog)
Related:
tune2fs – adjust tunable filesystem parameters (Unix Tutorial)

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