Category: networking

Raspberry Pi Zero – Establishing an Ethernet connection (ENC28J60)

Thanks to the inexpensive Raspberry Pi Zero, Internet of Things (IoT) projects will continue to grow. One disadvantage which the Zero (not W) and A+ models have is the lack of Ethernet connectivity. That would not be a problem, if not just a single (micro) USB port onboard.

In order to connect these models with the network by Ethernet cable without a WLAN adapter, one can do this over the GPIOs: All you need is the “ENC28J60” module, the connection of which is shown in this tutorial.

Source: Raspberry Pi Zero – Establishing an Ethernet connection (ENC28J60) (Raspberry Pi Tutorials)

SSH port forwarding (tunneling) in Linux

In this tutorial, we will cover SSH port forwarding in Linux. This is a function of the SSH utility that Linux administrators use to create encrypted and secure relays across different systems.

SSH port forwarding, also called SSH tunneling, is used to create a secure connection between two or more systems. Applications can then use these tunnels to transmit data.

Source: SSH port forwarding (tunneling) in Linux – Like Geeks

SSLH – Share A Same Port For HTTPS And SSH

Some Internet service providers and corporate companies might have blocked most of the ports, and allowed only a few specific ports such as port 80 and 443 to tighten their security. In such cases, we have no choice, but use a same port for multiple programs, say the HTTPS Port 443, which is rarely blocked. Here is where SSLH, a SSL/SSH multiplexer, comes in help. It will listen for incoming connections on a port 443. To put this more simply, SSLH allows us to run several programs/services on port 443 on a Linux system. So, you can use both SSL and SSH using a same port at the same time. If you ever been in a situation where most ports are blocked by the firewalls, you can use SSLH to access your remote server. This brief tutorial describes how to share a same port for https, ssh using SSLH in Unix-like operating systems.

Source: SSLH – Share A Same Port For HTTPS And SSH – OSTechNix
Related: Install sslh on Mac OSX

How to Setup a Raspberry Pi Samba Server – Pi My Life Up

In this Raspberry Pi Samba tutorial, we will be showing you how you can share directories from your Raspberry Pi using the SMB/CIFS protocols.

Source: How to Setup a Raspberry Pi Samba Server – Pi My Life Up

How to Use Raspberry Pi as a VPN Gateway

A VPN (Virtual Private Network) protects your privacy by routing all your Internet traffic through an encrypted server that your ISP (or hackers) can’t see. Setting up and using a log-free VPN service from your PC desktop is straightforward enough, but other devices in your home such as your game console and set-top box don’t let you install VPN software.

One solution is to buy a router that can connect directly to a VPN service, protecting all the traffic on your home network a single stroke. But it could be cheaper (and simpler) just to route all your traffic through a Raspberry Pi that remains connected to the VPN at all times.

Source: How to Use Raspberry Pi as a VPN Gateway – Tom’s Hardware

How To Create A VPN Killswitch Using Iptables on Linux

Use iptables to create a VPN killswitch to protect against data leaks.

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If you’re connected to a VPN, you need a killswitch. No, it’s not as metal as it sounds. It’s just a mechanism that stops your Internet connection when you’re disconnected from the VPN. It protects you from inadvertently leaking sensitive information onto the Internet when the VPN connection drops.

Source: How To Create A VPN Killswitch Using Iptables on Linux – LinuxConfig.org

Convert an older model USB printer to a networked printer using a Raspberry Pi or other Linux-based computer — also works well for making an older printer compatible with a newer version of MacOS

We originally set out to do this because we were having problems getting an older model laser printer, specifically a Konica Minolta PP1350W, to work with MacOS High Sierra (10.13). With previous versions of MacOS we’d been able to connect the printer directly to the computer, and with some fiddling with drivers and other software, get it to work. But newer versions of MacOS seem to be far less tolerant of this, and we had a spare Raspberry Pi, so the idea came to us to use the Raspberry Pi as a bridge between the printer and any computers on the local network from which we wanted to be able to print. The bonus is that the printer is no longer tethered to a single machine, but instead can potentially be used by any computer on the local network.

You do not need to have a Raspberry Pi to make this work – any computer that can run Linux will do. And of course the Raspberry Pi or other Linux computer can be used for other purposes besides this. We do not guarantee that this technique will work for every older printer out there, but this will work with a surprising number of them.

Source: Convert an older model USB printer to a networked printer using a Raspberry Pi or other Linux-based computer — also works well for making an older printer compatible with a newer version of MacOS – Two “Sort Of” Tech Guys

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