Category Archives: hardware

Raspberry Pi Pushbutton Shutdown/Startup

This is extracted from a single post by user RonR in a thread about FreePBX for the Raspberry Pi on DSLReports. I though it might be useful to many Raspberry Pi users:

Raspberry Pi Pushbutton Shutdown/Startup

The attached script will install shutdown and startup capability using a SPST NO momentary pushbutton
switch connected to GPIO header pins 5 and 6. Pressing the button on a running system will initiate
a graceful shutdown (shutdown -h now). Once shut down, pressing the button will restart the system.

1. Copy install and gpio-shutdown.dtbo to the Raspberry Pi.

2. Make the install script executable:

$ chmod +x install

3. Run the install script:

$ sudo ./install

4. Reboot

For additional info, see:

http://www.stderr.nl/Blog/Hardware/RaspberryPi/PowerButton.html

The script can be downloaded from RonR’s original post or directly from https://www.dslreports.com/r0/download/2324182~6a03744946c51bfa4876b6ecd8d4528c/PushButton.zip

FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus — a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

Image from manufacturer’s site

… there is a new Raspberry Pi competitor that is quite affordable. In fact, some folks may view it as a Pi-killer. The $30 FriendlyElec NanoPi M1 Plus has an arguably superior design and layout, plus important integrated features like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. It even has an IR receiver, onboard microphone, 8GB storage, and both power and reset buttons. Best of all? It is ready to run Debian, Ubuntu Core, and Ubuntu Mate from the start.

Source: FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus — a $30 Raspberry Pi killer (BetaNews)

Raspberry Pi: Extending the life of the SD card

I realized after posting this that it is a repeat post, but those new to the Raspberry Pi might not have seen the original post, so here it is again:

SD cards are said to have a finite life. If you are planning on running a Raspberry Pi 24x7x365, there are some steps that you can take with GNU/Linux to extend the life of the card: here are some ideas.

Source: Raspberry Pi: Extending the life of the SD card | ZDNet

Disposing Of A PC? Nuke The Drive First.

Deleting your files isn’t good enough. Not even if you empty the recycle bin afterwards. Nor is formatting the drive. There are plenty of ways to recover data in such circumstances. Instead, you need a specialist program that can wipe the entire drive by storing random data onto every part of it, multiple times.

Source: Disposing Of A PC? Nuke The Drive First. | Gizmo’s Freeware

5 Warning Signs That Your SSD Is About to Break Down & Fail

Whether you’re buying a laptop or a desktop today, it’s advisable to get a Solid State Drive (SSD) over a traditional Hard Disk Drive (HDD). SSDs are faster, more stable, and conserve less power, making them superior in every way. But that doesn’t mean SSDs are flawless.

Source: 5 Warning Signs That Your SSD Is About to Break Down & Fail (MakeUseOf)

7-Port USB Hub For Raspberry Pi

UUGear 7-port Hub UUGear have just released a new 7-port USB hub add-on board for the Raspberry Pi. It is an updated version of the device they released in 2014. It has the same footprint as the Pi and can be attached to all Raspberry Pi versions which currently includes Models A, B, A+, B+, 2B, 3B and Zero. Unlike most other Pi add-ons boards this product is designed to be mounted underneath the Pi which keeps the top surface free for messing about with GPIO pins and the camera interface.

Source: 7-Port USB Hub For Raspberry Pi (Raspberry Pi Spy)

How To Test Solid State Drive Health with GNOME Disks | Linux.com

Solid State Drives (SSDs) are slowly becoming the norm, with good reason. They are faster, and the latest iterations are more reliable than traditional drives. With no moving parts to wear out, these drives can (effectively) enjoy a longer life than standard platter-based drives.

Even though these drives are not prone to mechanical failure, you will still want to keep tabs on their health. After all, your data depends on the storing drives being sound and running properly. Many SSDs you purchase are shipped with software that can be used to monitor said health. However, most of that software is, as you might expect, Windows-only. Does that mean Linux users must remain in the dark as to their drive health? No. Thanks to a very handy tool called GNOME Disks, you can get a quick glimpse of your drive health and run standard tests on the drive.

Source: How To Test Solid State Drive Health with GNOME Disks | Linux.com