Tag: ssh

How to Keep Processes Running after SSH Logout in Linux

It happens many time that we try to access an app or content, but it ask for re-login or a popup which states your session is timed out. The session generally times out when content is kept idle and no transaction is performed. Many times “session_time” variable is set, which keeps active connection for time being. But what happens when session times out, a “SIGNUP” signal is sent to processes running in background as well as for processes that are children of the main process which are forced to terminate regardless of completion or partial completion of task. So how can we keep are the process running even after SSH Logout? In this article, I will explain how to keep the process running even after SSH is disconnected from a Linux terminal (Ubuntu 18.04 and CentOS 7).

Source: How to Keep Processes Running after SSH Logout in Linux (LinOxide)

How to Use SSH Pipes on Linux

Like most commands on Linux, SSH can be used with input/output redirection via | (Unix Pipe). SSH can be used with this pipeline too. The basic concept here is understanding how the Unix pipeline works.

When you understand the way pipes work, you can get seriously creative. This article covers what happens when you combine Unix pipes and SSH. It should be noted that since Unix pipes can be just about anything, there are no doubt going to be commands not on this list would also be useful.

NOTE: Among other things, this article shows how to do remote hard drive backup and restoration, by creating an image (.img file) of a hard drive on a remote system, assuming that you have sufficient space on the remote backup drive for the image file.

Source: How to Use SSH Pipes on Linux

Raspberry Pi as a SOCKS proxy and SSH file server Tutorial

A couple redditors showed interest in how I set up my Pi as a SOCKS proxy and recommended I make a separate post as a tutorial, so I’ll do my best to explain everything.

Background

SOCKS stands for Socket Secure, and is essentially just a middle man for a server and client for send information between. The best description I’ve heard of it is “It’s a poor man’s VPN.” It essentially works the same, but each service has to be configured to work with it (i.e. I have Firefox on my Mac working through my SOCKS proxy but not Chrome and Safari). Why would you want a SOCKS proxy over a VPN? From my experience, it runs better on a Pi, and I can also do multiple things over SSH (such as also run a file server). Having to configure each service to run through it can also be a pro or a con, depending on if you want everything to work through it or not.

Basic Overview

There’s really not much to setting everything up; it’s a pretty straightforward process. For those just looking for something short and sweet, here are the basic steps I followed. I’ll go over each more in depth below.

Source: RPi as a SOCKS proxy and SSH file server Tutorial (Reddit/Raspberry Pi)

5 Ways to Keep Remote SSH Sessions and Processes Running After Disconnection

In this article, we will explain five useful techniques to keep your remote SSH terminal sessions running even after session disconnection under Linux systems.

Source: 5 Ways to Keep Remote SSH Sessions and Processes Running After Disconnection (Tecmint)

Secure Shell Access (SSH) – Linux Command Line | Code Snipcademy

Secure Shell Access (SSH) – Learn about Secure Shell Access (SSH), private and public keys, SCP, and all other topics related to the ssh command in our beginner’s tutorial.

Introduction – Introduction to SSH, how it’s better than telnet and basic ssh commands.

SSH Keys: RSA and DSA – Learn about SSH public and private keys, along with the most widely used key types – RSA and DSA. Also learn how to easily copy your public key to a host server with the ssh-copy-id command.

SSH Agent and SSH Add – Learn how to use the SSH agent daemon and the ssh-add command to manage your SSH keys and passphrases.

Secure Copying (SCP) – Learn how to use the scp command to upload and download files from remote hosts.

Source: Secure Shell Access (SSH) – Linux Command Line | Code Snipcademy

How To : Set up a FTPS (FTP over SSL) Server on Linux ~ Your Own Linux..!

FTP is a standardized network protocol and probably the quickest as well as easiest option available when a large chunk of data is to be transferred, from one host to another, over a TCP-based network. FTP defines a client-server architecture which uses two separate ‘well-known’ ports, for data (port no. 20, used for data transfer) and control (port no. 21, used for authentication) connections, in order to establish connectivity between the server and the client.

Source: How To : Set up a FTPS (FTP over SSL) Server on Linux ~ Your Own Linux..!

Link: How to access a Linux server behind NAT via reverse SSH tunnel

You are running a Linux server at home, which is behind a NAT router or restrictive firewall. Now you want to SSH to the home server while you are away from home. How would you set that up? SSH port forwarding will certainly be an option. However, port forwarding can become tricky if you are dealing with multiple nested NAT environment. Besides, it can be interfered with under various ISP-specific conditions, such as restrictive ISP firewalls which block forwarded ports, or carrier-grade NAT which shares IPv4 addresses among users.

What is Reverse SSH Tunneling?

One alternative to SSH port forwarding is reverse SSH tunneling. …..

Full article here:
How to access a Linux server behind NAT via reverse SSH tunnel (Xmodulo)

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