Tag: Debian

Link: Linux: Keep An Eye On Your System With Glances Monitor

Is there is a tool that can provide me a maximum of information (such as cpu, disk I/O, network, nfsd, memory and more) about my Linux/Unix server in a minimum of space in a terminal?

…..

Say hello to Glances

From the project home page:

Glances is a free (LGPL) cross-platform curses-based monitoring tool which aims to present a maximum of information in a minimum of space, ideally to fit in a classical 80×24 terminal or higher to have additionnal information. Glances can adapt dynamically the displayed information depending on the terminal size. It can also work in a client/server mode for remote monitoring.

Full article here:
Linux: Keep An Eye On Your System With Glances Monitor (nixCraft)

Note that in addition to the above article, the project page for Glances can be found here.

Link: How to Install and Configure UFW – An Un-complicated FireWall in Debian/Ubuntu

The ufw (Uncomplicated Firewall) is an frontend for most widely used iptables firewall and it is well comfortable for host-based firewalls. ufw gives a framework for managing netfilter, as well as provides a command-line interface for controlling the firewall. It provides user friendly and easy to use interface for Linux newbies who are not much familiar with firewall concepts.

While, on the other side same complicated commands helps administrators it set complicated rules using command line interface. The ufw is an upstream for other distributions such as Debian, Ubuntu and Linux Mint.

Full article here:
How to Install and Configure UFW – An Un-complicated FireWall in Debian/Ubuntu (TecMint)

Link: Debian and Ubuntu Linux: Set openssh SeverKeyBits to 1024

The upstream openssh project sets the value ServerKeyBits to 1024, but Debian and Ubuntu currently unfortunately have a lower security setting of 768 bits. I’ve filed a bug to fix this. In the meantime, here is how to make that change now!

Full article here:
Debian and Ubuntu Linux: Set openssh SeverKeyBits to 1024 (scottlinux.com)

Link: How To Protect SSH with fail2ban on Debian 7

Having a server or computer connected to a network comes with a certain amount of risk. Any machine, including a VPS, connected to the internet is a potential target for malicious attacks.

While having a well-configured firewall will prevent many kinds of illegitimate access, you still need to open up certain services to allow yourself the ability to log in and administer the server. SSH is the service most commonly used to log into remote systems, and so it also is one of the most frequently targeted.

Fortunately, there is a tool available that can mitigate this attack vector, called fail2ban. This can be configured to allow legitimate logins using SSH, but ban IP addresses after they have failed to authenticate correctly after a set number of times.

Full article here:
How To Protect SSH with fail2ban on Debian 7 (DigitalOcean)

Link: How to Replace the Unity Desktop on Ubuntu Using apt-get

We think Unity pretty much sucks. If you do too, you have choices, as outlined here:

How to Replace the Unity Desktop on Ubuntu Using apt-get (Linux.com)

Another choice would be to switch to a better Linux distribution. Many people seem to like Linux Mint; others simply go back to plain old Debian (both Ubuntu and Mint are based on Debian).

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