Category: OpenVPN

Setting up an OpenVPN tunnel using a CentOS-based system as the server and a router flashed with Tomato firmware as the client – Part 1

 

Important
This is an edited version of a post that originally appeared on a blog called The Michigan Telephone Blog, which was written by a friend before he decided to stop blogging. It is reposted with his permission. Comments dated before the year 2013 were originally posted to his blog. The link to Amazon.com in this article is an affiliate link, and if you make a purchase through that link I will receive a small commission on the sale.

Some readers of this blog may recall that several months ago I had wished for a Simple VPN device – back then I had written:

There is another type of software that ought to be moved into its own box, and that is Virtual Private Network (VPN) client and server software. Yes, I’m aware of OpenVPN, and I tried to find setup instructions that someone like me could understand, but to no avail – it looks like you need a degree in computer networking to understand how to set up this type of software. And yet, built into hardware devices, it could be immensely useful in certain circumstances. Let’s consider the following diagram:

Diagram showing position of "client side" and "server side" VPN devices

In this particular case we have a SIP-based VoIP adapter at a remote location. Anyone who has worked with Asterisk behind the wrong kind of firewall knows the issues involved with using SIP and not having things set up just so (one-way audio, anyone)? But also, we may for whatever reason want that “remote” VoiP adapter to appear as if it were on the local network (maybe we have an ISP playing games with SIP packets?). So we plug the VoIP adapter into our “VPN Client-Side Device” and on the other end, we have a companion “VPN Server-Side Device” which in this case makes two connections to the router – one to receive the “tunneled” data and the second to send the unencrypted data back onto the local network. The green arrows represent the “tunnel”, the orange arrows show where the data from the VoIP adapter enters and exits the tunnel. Please note this is entirely a wired connection, we aren’t using wireless anywhere here. Also note that as far as the VoIP adapter is concerned, the only network it can “see” is the one at the other end of the tunnel – under no circumstances can it access the Internet other than by going through the tunnel.

I show this using a VoIP adapter, but I’m sure that people could think of a lot of other ways this could be used, and a lot of other devices that could be connected to the client end.

Now some will probably argue that it is inefficient to have a device that does nothing but provide the tunnel. But that’s the point – almost anyone could set this up. If you send the client-side device to your grandmother, she can set it up (well, maybe that’s pushing it a bit, but you get my point). People who would never touch a Linux box or a server could use this.

I want to tell you, when I wrote that I had no idea just how difficult it would be to actually get VPN tunneling working using OpenVPN.  The problem isn’t that it doesn’t work — actually, it works quite well — the problem is that it’s a real bear to set up, unless you have someone who knows what they are doing walk you through it.  Unfortunately, you may not haves someone who knows what they are doing to help you, so you’re stuck with me (unless you can find a better page on the subject – if such exists, please let us know in a comment).

The real issue is that you have to learn so many new things at once to make this work.  So, my attempt here is going to be to try and give you a “cookbook”, with plenty of screenshots so you can see how things actually look when everything is configured.  I’m actually also going to approach this in a slightly backward manner, showing you how to configure the client first, then the server.  My theory is that you will think that configuring the client is so simple that configuring the server can’t be much harder, and you’ll get sucked into the project before you realize what you’ve gotten yourself into! 🙂

By the way, what we are doing here doesn’t look exactly like the diagram above – instead it looks more like this (note that the “Primary Router” on the client side can be omitted if you don’t need any UN-tunneled connections, or if the DSL or Cable modem has a built-in router):

Diagram showing position of OpenVPN client and OpenVPN server in data flow
Diagram showing position of OpenVPN client and OpenVPN server in data flow

For our client, we need something that you can plug your desired device into. You may have a laptop, and you want to communicate securely with a home office. You may have a VoIP adapter, and you want to make secure calls to a remote Asterisk server.  While you can run a software client on the Laptop, when you have a hardware device like a VoIP adapter your choices become more limited.  The solution is to purchase a router that is capable of being re-flashed with custom firmware.  In this case we are going to use the Tomato firmware, and in particular, a version of the firmware designed to support OpenVPN as either a client or a server. Here we’re going to use it as a client. The idea will be that ANY device plugged into the router will automatically use the VPN tunnel, and if for some reason the tunnel isn’t available then the connected device will not be able to communicate, therefore there’s little chance that an insecure communication can take place.

Some readers will already have a router capable of running Tomato firmware, and some will not.  The main Tomato Firmware page shows which routers are supported.  If you do not already have one of these and plan to buy one, I recommend that you consider the Asus WL-520GU. I know that the main Tomato firmware page says there’s no USB support for that model, but that’s not necessary for what we’re going to do, and it’s not even true if you use the recommended firmware build. The reason I suggest using the WL-520GU is because I’m told that although it’s not totally impossible to “brick” the router by doing a bad flash, if you do make a mistake, your chances of being able to recover (so that the router isn’t consigned to being an expensive paperweight) are far better than with some other models.

I should mention here that I inherited this project from someone else who couldn’t get it to work.  I had made the mistake of casually suggesting they get the Asus router if they wanted to attempt this, only to find them on my doorstep with router in hand.  So again, I’m not saying this will be easy, and the one thing I will not tell you how to do is how to get the Tomato firmware onto your router.  The reason is that if I give you instructions and leave out a step and you brick your router, you will be mad at me.  Better you find someone else’s instructions, and if they’ve left out a step, you can be mad at them. I will mention that, at least in the case of the Asus router I had here, it was a two-step process – I used the Asus Firmware Restoration Utility to first install DD-WRT (using these instructions) and then used DD-WRT’s web interface (Administration -> Firmware Upgrade) to install Tomato (I’m skipping a whole tale of woe and grief that transpired between those two events). Basically I followed the instructions at An Easy Guide to Installing Tomato on the Asus 520gu, but I’m not telling you to do that — it’s up to you which instructions you wish to follow.

Why Tomato instead of DD-WRT?  Because Tomato works, that’s why. But if you want to try getting it working on DD-WRT, go ahead, knock yourself silly (only one tip for you, from a tweet by @pista01 on Twitter —  if you keep getting TLS errors, make sure your NTP client is set up). If you succeed, great for you. If you don’t, you’re welcome to come back here and continue on.

But don’t just grab the first build of the Tomato firmware that you see. You need one that includes VPN support.  There are two versions I would highly recommend — if you have taken my advice and acquired an Asus WL-520GU (or similar model with built-in USB port), then I recommend teddy bear’s build because it enables the “missing” USB support, and also includes the VPN support from SgtPepperKSU’s build — which is the one you should get if you DON’T have the Asus WL-520GU, but instead have some other compatible router (EDIT: Advanced users may also wish to check out thor2002ro’s build, which offers both the VPN and USB support from the aforementioned builds, plus support for SDHC, SNMP, and perhaps other additional features.  I haven’t tested that one at all, and note that recent versions probably won’t work with many router models due to memory requirements, so unless you really need one of the features in that version and know that your router supports it, I’d stick with one of the other versions). Make sure you read up on the chosen build and be sure you get the correct firmware version.  For the Asus I used the binary from inside the tomato-1.25-ND-USB-8632-vpn3.3.rar archive, but since then a newer version has been released (tomato-1.25-ND-USB-8634-vpn3.4.rar was released in August, 2009), or you may prefer a different version.

tomatoIn this series you will see several screenshots.  I’m using the custom “Tomato USB” theme, so the colors and “look” may be a bit different than what you see, but other than that everything’s in the same place as with the default theme. Later (after taking the screenshots) I replaced the tomato.png file from the theme with the one you see at the right, which I happen to like a little bit better.

Two other caveats: Although this router has wireless capability, for this application we aren’t going to use it — it’s going to be used on a wired network only.  That said, once you get it set up and working, feel free to experiment with the wireless capabilities if you like — just be aware that if something on the wireless side of things doesn’t work, I really can’t assist you. And also, we’re assuming that everything plugged into this router will be using the VPN tunnel full time, which implies that this router might (perhaps in a majority of cases) be plugged into another router, so that some other devices can access the local Internet connection, while the devices plugged into this router are limited to going through the tunnel. Note that if this router is plugged into another router, it would be preferable (but not absolutely essential) if it were in that router’s DMZ, so that you don’t have double NAT (Network Address Translation) taking place.

And now, a word about OpenVPN.  OpenVPN supports two different modes of operation — TAP and TUN.  In this case, we are using TUN.  We MIGHT explore TAP at a later time, but TUN is easier to set up, and ANYTHING that can be done to simplify this process is worthwhile.  The main difference, from the users point of view, is that using TUN the two ends of the tunnel occupy two different portions of the local address range.  In this case, on our “home” LAN, the addresses are in the 192.168.0.x range and are assigned by the main router.  At the client end of the tunnel, the router running the Tomato firmware will hand out addresses in the 192.168.5.x range.  Neither router steps on the other’s toes, so to speak, when handing out addresses.  And there is one other difference — although shared directories can be accessed across the network, Windows/Samba shares cannot be “seen” on opposite ends of the tunnel. If you know they are there and know the IP address and share name of the hosting device, you can still access them, but the mechanism that advertises shares doesn’t cross the tunnel.

With TAP, on the other hand, the router at the primary location hands out IP addresses in the same local address range to devices on both sides of the tunnel, and also (in theory, anyway) shares will be “advertised” across the tunnel.  Sound like what you’d want, right?  Except that when we tried to set it up on the server side, somehow we managed to bring down the entire network – it basically acted like a denial-of-service attack on the entire LAN, and the problem stopped the moment we went back to using TUN. After you’ve messed with this stuff long enough, something like that can leave a rather bitter taste in your mouth, so we decided to stick with what worked.  In our particular application, seeing shares across the LAN would not be essential. Even if you eventually want to try using TAP, I suggest setting it up using TUN first, then when you have achieved that you can cross your fingers and try switching the mode to TUN at both ends.  I doubt it will work easily for you, but experimentation is certainly welcome.

If you want to know more about TUN/TAP and other OpenVPN options, you might want to get the book Beginning OpenVPN 2.0.9 (Amazon affiliate link) by Markus Feilner and Norbert Graf — see my recent mini-review of this book (links edited February, 2010 to reflect updated and expanded edition of the book).

So with the preliminaries out of the way, let’s get to the client screenshots…

Tomato Firmware - Basic | Network page
Tomato Firmware – Basic | Network page

This first shot shows the header, sidebar, and Save/Cancel buttons. Since the settings are probably a bit hard to read, we’ll zoom in on the pertinent part:

Settings portion of Basic | Network page
Settings portion of Basic | Network page

The main thing to keep in mind here is that the subnet you select must not conflict with address assignments on the primary network at the server. Next, on the Router Identification page, enter a Hostname to identify the router:

Basic | Identification page
Basic | Identification page

One thing I have read in several places is that it’s important for the time to be set accurately at the client.  For your choice of time servers there are several presets, but if you use Custom you can specify one or more of your own as the first choice(s), if you have a machine on your network that acts as an NTP server:

Basic | Time page
Basic | Time page

At this point you should probably go to the Administration | Admin Access page and set things up there to your liking. Remember that anything you make accessible on the router’s local LAN will also be accessible on the other side of your tunnel using the same security methods, so be careful.

Now to what we came for… setting up the VPN client. Click on VPN Tunneling and then on Client. I’ll say that one more time – you MUST click on Client. It’s far too easy to skip that step and accidentally be trying to configure a server! Then you should be at the Client 1, Basic tab:

VPN | Client page, Basic tab
VPN | Client page, Basic tab

Of course, the button at the bottom of the page will sat “Start Now” instead of “Stop Now” – I took these screenshots through the tunnel, so I couldn’t very well stop it to get that little detail right! After setting that up you want to click on the Advanced tab:

VPN | Client page, Advanced tab
VPN | Client page, Advanced tab

Note that the connection retry value is -1 (which means infinite retries) and there are two added lines in the custom configuration section:

keepalive 10 120
float

In case the connection to the server or the Internet goes down for a time, those settings should cause the client to keep attempting to re-establish the connection to the server. The float command is useful if your client is at a location where the ISP might change the IP address without advance notice — it is supposed to allow the VPN connection to survive an IP address change. You can omit float if your client is at a fixed IP address that is not subject to change.

And then the Keys tab – just take a look now, when we move on to the server I’ll explain how these are filled in:

VPN | Client page, Keys tab
VPN | Client page, Keys tab

There is one more thing that needs to be done (besides adding the keys) for our tunnel on the client side. Go to Administration | Scripts and click on the WAN Up tab. Enter the following two lines into the text box:

route del -net 0.0.0.0
route add -host `nvram get vpn_client1_addr` gw `nvram get wan_gateway`

The second line may wrap on your display due to length. You may want to copy and paste those lines so you get them right, but if you must type them, note that the ` characters are actually backticks – the small apostrophe-like character on the key to the left of the “1” key (the number 1) near the top left corner of most keyboards (well, in my part of the world, anyway). Then click on the Save button way down at the bottom of the page. If you fail to do this and your tunnel ever goes down (server dies or is inaccessible, etc.) there is a possibility that traffic that should go through the tunnel will use the local Internet connection instead.  These two lines will keep that from happening. When you are done it should look like this:

Administration | Scripts page | WAN Up tab
Administration | Scripts page | WAN Up tab

Just a note for future reference: You can optionally add an additional line here to allow you to get to something “upstream” of the network on the WAN side of the router. For example, let’s say you have configured the server to allow you to connect to devices on both the LAN subnet (192.168.5.x in our example here) and also devices connected to the primary router, in other words, on the WAN side of the router running the Tomato firmware (which were in the 192.168.1.x range on our example setup). But let’s suppose that upstream of that, you have a cable modem at 192.168.100.1 at the client location that you’d also like to be able to access. As long as you don’t have a conflicting address elsewhere in your network, you could add a line such as this in your WAN Up script:

route add -net 192.168.100.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 gw `nvram get wan_gateway`

… which would allow access to anything in the range of 192.168.100.0 through 192.168.100.255. If you want to be more specific, you can narrow it down to an exact address:

route add -host 192.168.100.1 gw `nvram get wan_gateway`

We’ll cover what else has to be done to enable this type of additional routing at the server end in the upcoming installments, but the above is what has to be done at the client-side router that is running the Tomato firmware. Note that you do not normally have to a a line such as this to get to devices on the same subnets as the LAN or WAN ports of the router, but just for anything upstream of the network that the WAN port of the router is connected to. If you don’t understand why you might want to add this type of additional routing now, just ignore this information for the time being, but make sure you do add the first two lines I mentioned above.

Once your tunnel is operational, you should go to the Advanced | Routing page and look at the Current Routing Table. Your addresses will differ (this was a test setup; you probably will see a wider range of addresses) but the main thing you want to make sure is that there is never an entry of default (or 0.0.0.0) in the destination column that goes to any interface other than a tunnel (tun11 in this illustration) — you should never see that whether the tunnel is enabled or disabled. If you do, then something’s likely wrong with the two lines you entered above (under the WAN Up tab):

Advanced | Routing page
Advanced | Routing page

So, that’s the basic client setup. Wasn’t too difficult, right? Ah, but just wait until we get going on the server — hopefully I can make it easy enough that you won’t have about three weeks worth of sleepless nights, when you occasionally mutter under your breath things like “Why? Why?? Why??? WHY won’t this damn thing work!”, and other things I’d rather not put on the Internet! But before I can write the next part, I REALLY need to catch some ZZZ’s, so the server will have to wait for part 2.

Review of OpenVPN: Building and Integrating Virtual Private Networks by Markus Feilner (Packt Publishing)

 

Important
This is an edited version of a post that originally appeared on a blog called The Michigan Telephone Blog, which was written by a friend before he decided to stop blogging. It is reposted with his permission. Comments dated before the year 2013 were originally posted to his blog. In order to comply with Federal Trade Commission regulations, I am disclosing that he received a free product sample of the item under review prior to writing the review, and that any links to Amazon.com in this article are affiliate links, and if you make a purchase through one of those links I will receive a small commission on the sale.
Cover of OpenVPN: Building and Integrating Virtual Private Networks
Cover of OpenVPN: Building and Integrating Virtual Private Networks

Before I start, let me give you a brief description of what’s in each chapter (this is taken directly from the Packt Publishing web site):

  • Chapter 1 looks at what VPNs are, how they evolved during the last decade, why it is necessary to modern enterprises, how typical VPNs work. The chapter also covers some essential networking concepts.
  • Chapter 2 explains VPN security issues, including symmetric and asymmetric encryption, the SSL/TLS library, and SSL certificates.
  • Chapter 3 introduces OpenVPN. In this chapter, we learn about the history of OpenVPN, how OpenVPN works, and how OpenVPN compares to IPSec VPN applications.
  • Chapter 4 covers installing OpenVPN on both Windows, the Mac, Linux, and FreeBSD. It covers the installation on Linux from the source code and RPM packages. Installation on Suse and Debian is covered in detail.
  • In Chapter 5, an encryption key for OpenVPN is created and it is then used to setup up our first OpenVPN Tunnel between two windows systems in the same network. The key is then copied on a Linux system and this system is connected through a tunnel to the first windows machine.
  • Chapter 6 shows how to create x509 server and client certificates for use with OpenVPN. easy-rsa which comes with OpenVPN and is available for both Windows and Linux is used.
  • Chapter 7 reviews the syntax of the command line tool openvpn, which enables building tunnels quickly. The configuration options of openvpn are covered in detail with examples.
  • Chapter 8 shows how to make the example tunnels created earlier safer and persistent by choosing a reliable combination of configuration file parameters. It then covers how to configure firewalls on Linux and Windows to work with OpenVPN.
  • Chapter 9 focuses on using xca, the advanced Windows tool with which x509 certificates can be easily managed. Its Linux equivalent, Tinyca2, which can even manage multiple certificate authorities, is also covered.
  • Chapter 10 covers advanced OpenVPN configurations, including Tunneling through a proxy server, pushing routing commands to clients, pushing and setting the default route through a tunnel, Distributed compilation through VPN tunnels with distcc, and OpenVPN scripting.
  • Chapter 11 shows how to debug and monitor VPN tunnels. It covers standard networking tools that can be used for scanning and testing the connectivity of a VPN server.

Although this may seem like a strange subject for this blog, I have recently become interested in the concept of Virtual Private Networks (VPN) because of the increasing number of attacks on Asterisk-based system based on spoof SIP credentials. SIP, the most popular protocol for VoIP, is an inherently insecure protocol – it relies on password protection only, and on most Asterisk boxes and in many VoIP devices and software products, the password is stored in plain text. On many systems, the user name is the same as the extension number, so all a potential intruder has to do is start a brute-force attack guessing passwords. The use of strong passwords along with the use of software like Fail2Ban (with iptables) can help minimize the exposure, but in the end it’s still only password protection.

Therefore, my feeling is that it would be much better to restrict extensions to access from within the local network (wherever possible), using the permit/deny fields in FreePBX or some similar mechanism, and then “tunnel” remote extensions through a secure VPN, so they appear to be on the local network.  The VPN could do the heavy lifting for security (even making the actual calls secure, although that wasn’t a priority in my situation).  My problem was that I knew next to nothing about VPN’s, and most of the pages on the Web seemed to assume at least some prior knowledge.  I needed something that would take me from zero knowledge to VPN guru.  Unfortunately, at my age it’s a case of “the spirit is willing but the brain is a bit weak”, so I realized that the “guru” part might not come very quickly (just as a comparison, I’ve been playing with FreePBX since back in the Asterisk@Home days, and there’s still a lot I don’t understand, but for the first year or so I felt totally lost).

Since the folks at Packt Publishing were willing to send me a review copy of OpenVPN: Building and Integrating Virtual Private Networks, I decided to see if I could actually learn anything from the book.  The first thing you need to know is that there are many types of VPN’s out there, and each will only communicate with its own kind, as it were.  The problem with most other tunnels is that they are either not all that secure, or contain proprietary code, or are incredibly complicated to set up and use (or some combination of the above).  OpenVPN has several advantages, perhaps the biggest being that it’s open source (so you can, if you are so inclined, examine the code and make sure there are no “backdoors” built in), that it can be as secure as you want it to be (and it’s not that difficult to make it very secure), and that it doesn’t rely on a third-party service over which you have no control (like one VPN application that touts itself as “zero-configuration”). So of all the VPN methods out there, OpenVPN seemed like a logical choice.

Now, having said that, the book covers its subject in a very logical manner.  Advanced readers (those already familiar with the principles behind VPNs) might find the introductory material in the first chapters a bit tedious, but believe me, it was just what I needed to help me get a grasp on the subject. As you go further through the book, there are many actual examples, first showing how to set up a working VPN tunnel, then how to add additional security, and finally how to troubleshoot connections.  If you are brand new at this, like me, you will probably find that you learn a great deal from the first chapters but find the latter chapters (especially Chapter 10) a bit beyond your comprehension at first.  However, the person who has some networking or VPN experience under their belt may think the first chapters a bit elementary, but will find the real meat they are looking for in the latter parts of the book. Either way, I guarantee you will come away with a greater comprehension of the subject.

The book shows how to install OpenVPN on several platforms (Windows, Mac OS X using Tunnelblick, FreeBSD, and SuSE, Debian, and Redhat/Fedora based versions of Linux), but it seems like some platforms are better covered than others.  A disproportionate number of examples and screenshots seem to be based on a Windows installation, whereas the Mac gets very little coverage. Because there are so many variations of Linux, the coverage there is mixed, although it seems like SuSE and Debian are better covered than Fedora-based versions, which was just a little bit disappointing because most Asterisk and FreePBX systems are based on CentOS, which is a Fedora-based OS. But most of the information in this book is not OS specific, so I didn’t have any real problem following along.

The biggest disappointment for me was in Chapter 8, where the book covers the use of Webmin, but primarily as an aid to administration of the Shorewall firewall.  Many Asterisk/FreePBX systems don’t use Shorewall, but instead use iptables (if they have a firewall on the Asterisk server at all).  But what was really disappointing was that there was no mention of, nor instructions for the use of the OpenVPN + CA module for Webmin (page is in Italian, but here is a description in English). I can only guess that because the book was first released in May,  2006 and version 1.0 of the Webmin module had only just been released in January of that same year, the author perhaps hadn’t had an opportunity to work with the module before the final draft of the book was submitted to the publisher. I hope that if this book is ever updated and republished, there will be consideration given to adding a chapter on the use of the Webmin module to set up and administer OpenVPN. In the meantime, you can find instructions for using the OpenVPN + CA module in The ‘Point and Click’ Home VPN HowTo Guide.

That said, I felt I learned a great deal from this book.  I was able to set up an OpenVPN server (using the Webmin module, but the book definitely helped me understand the purpose of the various options, and when I checked the configuration file that the module generated I was able to spot a couple of things that weren’t the way they should be for my setup and was able to change them) and the Windows client.  It all worked beautifully.

My project now, when I have absolutely nothing else to do, is trying to get the OpenVPN client running on an Asus WL-520gu router that has the DD-WRT firmware installed (I inherited this project from someone else who couldn’t do it).  So far this has proven to be a tough nut to crack – although it should be easy because (if you get the right version of DD-WRT) there is a built-in OpenVPN client with a handy configuration page, it just doesn’t seem to work “out of the box” – and from what I’m reading on the ‘net, for every one person who says they’ve got it working, there are about twenty others who have become incredibly frustrated by the process (example here – note that the original poster says he got it working, but that’s followed by about 16 pages of comments, mostly by people who just can’t seem to get it to go).  It’s a bit strange because the Windows client will work perfectly (indicating it’s not an issue with the server) but the firmware client in DD-WRT just doesn’t seem to work.  If I ever get it figured out, I’ll try to post what I did in this blog, but so far I’ve had no luck.  That, however, is not the fault of the book – in my opinion it’s the fault of the writers of the DD-WRT firmware, who apparently included a half-baked OpenVPN client interface in the firmware (I know, it’s free software so I can’t really complain, but one does wish that they’d taken a bit more care to make sure it worked).

After having read the book, I do feel fairly confident that if I should throw in the towel and decide to dump DD-WRT and install a different firmware on the router (I’m thinking about trying the Tomato firmware with USB support) I would be able to install an OpenVPN client from scratch and make it work.  Probably the main reason I haven’t wanted to do that is because I very much prefer using a GUI to do things, and would like to try to make the OpenVPN GUI in DD-WRT work (even if it requires a little help), but so far that doesn’t seem to be panning out.

But I digress a bit – anyway, if you are wanting to learn about OpenVPN, whether or not you are a rank beginner you will benefit from this book. The numerous examples and screenshots make it almost impossible to fail to get an OpenVPN tunnel up and running (providing you’re not using a questionable firmware client). And, as I said above, the book is laid out in a very logical progression, so I really didn’t feel totally lost at any point (as so often happens when I try to read technical books). Especially in the case where your boss suddenly decides he needs VPN tunneling capability, and wants you to have one up and running in a very short timeframe, this would be the book to get!

OpenVPN: Building and Integrating Virtual Private Networks by Markus Feilner (Amazon affiliate link)

EDIT: This book has been updated and expanded under a new title — see Mini-review of Beginning OpenVPN 2.0.9 by Markus Feilner and Norbert Graf (Packt Publishing)

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