Category Archives: Security

Cronopete – An Apple Time Machine Clone For Linux

If you use Mac OS, you certainly have known about or used Time machine. It is a backup software application distributed with the Apple’s Mac OS X. It is used to backup your data to an external drive, so that you can restore them later from the backup. If you are a fan boy/girl of Time Machine, you need to check out “Cronopete”. It is the clone of Time Machine for Linux operating systems. Using Cronopete, we can easily create periodic backups of a Linux system. It supports popular Linux distributions, including Arch Linux, Debian, Fedora, and Ubuntu.

In this brief guide, we are going to see how to install and use Cronopete in Linux to backup and restore data.

Source: Cronopete – An Apple’s Time Machine Clone For Linux – OSTechNix
Related link: Easy Linux backup software with Time Machine like functionality | Nuxified.org

Read-only Raspberry Pi script: how to secure a micro SD card so nothing can be written to it

If you’ve ever built a Pi for a kiosk, installation or information display, you’ll find Adafruit’s read-only Pi script invaluable. This script disables all the write-to-SD-card functions, meaning that you can pull the plug without any risk of data loss or corruption. The Adafruit script forces Raspbian to store all its temporary data in memory, […]

Source: Read-only Raspberry Pi script: how to secure a micro SD card so nothing can be written to it – The MagPi Magazine

How to Use “ipset” to Block IPs from Country

Previously we learned how we can restrict or allow a particular country using GeoIP but in this article, we’ll cover how we can block large IP ranges using ipset module with iptables. IPset is a command line based utility which is used to administer the framework called IP sets inside the Linux kernel. An IP set may store IP addresses, networks, (TCP/UDP) port numbers, MAC addresses, interface names or combinations of them in a way, which ensures lightning speed when matching an entry against a set. It is an associative application for the iptables Linux firewall which allows us to setup rules quickly and easily to block a set of IP addresses. Here, we’ll see how we can use ipset module with iptables to block a large ranges of IP addresses in our linux based machine.

Source: How to Use “ipset” to Block IPs from Country (LinOxide)

How to Block IPs from Countries using Iptables Geoip Addons

We’ll learn how we can block traffic originated from specific country IPs using GeoIP database and linux iptables. Iptables is a command based utility program for configuring the linux kernel firewall which is implemented within the Netfilter project. Whereas GeoIP is a collection of IPs corresponding with the geographical locations where the geographical location is mapped with the IP addresses allocated at those specific organization, city, state and countries. The geographical co-ordinates in the GeoIP database are the often near the center of the population so it should not be used to identify a particular address or household. And with the help of a module called xt_geoip consisting in an iptables extension xtables-addon and the GeoIP database, we’ll perform country-based traffic filtering which helps us block or allow the traffic from a specific country.

Source: How to Block IPs from Countries using Iptables Geoip Addons (LinOxide)

Understanding Linux Permissions

Linux is a multiuser operating system. In a multiuser environment, it is necessary to ensure that a user cannot access or modify files or directories that they arent supposed to. File permissions provide a protection mechanism for controlling access to files and directories.

Linux’s file security model is based on that of Unix. Each file or directory can be accessed or modified by the user who created it, or a group of users who have been given permission to do so. Permissions can also be defined for other users that do not belong to either of these two categories.

In this guide, we will go over how file permissions work in Linux for beginners. We’ll cover how you can view the permissions associated with files and directories and also how you can change them.

Source: Understanding Linux Permissions (Linux Academy)

How to Clear the Google Chrome DNS Cache

Flushing your DNS cache can help to fix host connection problems you may experience when accessing some web pages. To get a better Internet access performance, Google built a caching system, not only for site content but DNS as well. So yes, Google Chrome does have a built-in internal DNS caching system – a hidden feature that allows users to manually clear out the Chrome DNS host cache from within the browser itself.

Flushing out the Chrome DNS cache can prove useful, especially when you have changed the DNS settings. If clearing out the DNS cache from the operating system level does not fix the host connection problems, clearing up Chrome’s own DNS cache should do the trick.

This article will show you step by step how to clear the Chrome DNS cache.

Source: How to Clear the Google Chrome DNS Cache – Make Tech Easier

OpenSnitch: The Little Snitch application like firewall tool for Linux

OpenSnitch screenshot

Little Snitch is a traditional software firewall for macOS. You can use it to monitor applications, preventing or permitting them to connect to attached networks through advanced rules. OpenSnitch is a GNU/Linux port of the Little Snitch application firewall written in Python.

Source: OpenSnitch: The Little Snitch application like firewall tool for Linux (nixCraft)

EDIT: The software seems to have evolved since the above article was written. For the most current information go to the OpenSnitch home page and the Github page.

Enpass Is The Free Cross-Platform Password Manager

Previously we covered KeePassXC password manager which is also free application. Here comes another password manager called Enpass, it is free and cross-platform available for Linux, Windows, Mac, Android, Blackberry, Windows Phone and iOS.

Source: Enpass Is The Free Cross-Platform Password Manager (NoobsLab)