Category: Linux

If you have privacy concerns regarding Etcher (now known as balenaEtcher), here are some alternatives

We’ve used Etcher several times, mostly to make a bootable SD card for a Raspberry Pi or to put a bootable image of a Linux distribution onto a USB thumb drive. But we’re rethinking that now because we’ve read some concerns about privacy when using Etcher, or balenaEtcher as it is now called. … All we wanted to point out is that if you do have any concerns about using Etcher or balenaEtcher, there are alternatives, depending on which operating system you are using:

Source: If you have privacy concerns regarding Etcher (now known as balenaEtcher), here are some alternatives – Two “Sort Of” Tech Guys

How to Enable Support for HFS on the Raspberry Pi

In this Raspberry Pi HFS tutorial, we will walk you through the steps to enabling support for Apples HFS Plus filesystem on your Raspberry Pi.

This tutorial will take you through the packages that you need to install to interact with HFS Plus drives. We will also show how to mount the drives and format a drive.

Source: How to Enable Support for HFS on the Raspberry Pi – Pi My Life Up

Beginners Guide to Cron Jobs and Crontab

In this guide, we will be diving into what is a cron job and crontab. We example what the cron is why you would want to use it. There is also a calculator you can use to generate a crontab entry.

Source: Beginners Guide to Cron Jobs and Crontab – Pi My Life Up

Seven God-Like Bash History Shortcuts You Will Actually Use

Most guides to bash history shortcuts exhaustively list all of the shortcuts available to you.

The problem I always had with that was that I would use them once, and then glaze over as I tried out all the possibilities. Then I’d move onto my working day and completely forget them, retaining only the well-known !! trick I learned when I first started using bash.

So most never got committed to memory.

Here I outline the shortcuts I actually use every day.

Source: Seven God-Like Bash History Shortcuts You Will Actually Use – zwischenzugs

SSLH – Share A Same Port For HTTPS And SSH

Some Internet service providers and corporate companies might have blocked most of the ports, and allowed only a few specific ports such as port 80 and 443 to tighten their security. In such cases, we have no choice, but use a same port for multiple programs, say the HTTPS Port 443, which is rarely blocked. Here is where SSLH, a SSL/SSH multiplexer, comes in help. It will listen for incoming connections on a port 443. To put this more simply, SSLH allows us to run several programs/services on port 443 on a Linux system. So, you can use both SSL and SSH using a same port at the same time. If you ever been in a situation where most ports are blocked by the firewalls, you can use SSLH to access your remote server. This brief tutorial describes how to share a same port for https, ssh using SSLH in Unix-like operating systems.

Source: SSLH – Share A Same Port For HTTPS And SSH – OSTechNix
Related: Install sslh on Mac OSX

How To Disable SSH reverse DNS Lookups in Linux/Unix system

By default, ssh server performs a reverse DNS lookup for authentication requests. This can be so annoying as you wait ten’s of seconds for the lookup to finish. You may experience a delay before receiving a password prompt while accessing a remote system via ssh.

This guide will show you how to disable SSH reverse DNS lookups in a Linux/Unix system. The method discussed here works for all Linux and Unix based operating systems running OpenSSH Server.

Source: How To Disable SSH reverse DNS Lookups in Linux/Unix system – Computing for Geeks

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