Category Archives: Linux

How To Set Up an OpenVPN Server on Ubuntu 18.04

OpenVPN is a full-featured, open-source Secure Socket Layer (SSL) VPN solution that accommodates a wide range of configurations. In this tutorial, you will set up an OpenVPN server on an Ubuntu 18.04 server and then configure access to it from Windows, macOS, iOS and/or Android. This tutorial will keep the installation and configuration steps as simple as possible for each of these setups.

Source: How To Set Up an OpenVPN Server on Ubuntu 18.04 | DigitalOcean

How to Keep Processes Running after SSH Logout in Linux

It happens many time that we try to access an app or content, but it ask for re-login or a popup which states your session is timed out. The session generally times out when content is kept idle and no transaction is performed. Many times “session_time” variable is set, which keeps active connection for time being. But what happens when session times out, a “SIGNUP” signal is sent to processes running in background as well as for processes that are children of the main process which are forced to terminate regardless of completion or partial completion of task. So how can we keep are the process running even after SSH Logout? In this article, I will explain how to keep the process running even after SSH is disconnected from a Linux terminal (Ubuntu 18.04 and CentOS 7).

Source: How to Keep Processes Running after SSH Logout in Linux (LinOxide)

If your mount.cifs has stopped working, try adding -o vers=3.0

If you have been using “mount.cifs …” or “sudo mount.cifs …” to mount a share located on a Windows machine in Linux, and it stops working after any kind of update or change to your network, try adding -o vers=3.0, or if you are already using some -o options, add vers=3.0 to the list (separated from any existing -o options by a comma). You could also try 2.0 rather than 3.0, but by default it tries to use 1.0 as the SMB protocol version, and Microsoft has removed support for that in some versions of Windows. So if you get a Windows upgrade that removes the 1.0 protocol, your existing mount-cifs invocation line may stop working, but it appears that sometimes other changes in the network can trigger this as well. The vers= option is explained on the mount.cifs man page as follows:

SMB protocol version. Allowed values are:

  • 1.0 – The classic CIFS/SMBv1 protocol. This is the default.
  • 2.0 – The SMBv2.002 protocol. This was initially introduced in Windows Vista Service Pack 1, and Windows Server 2008. Note that the initial release version of Windows Vista spoke a slightly different dialect
    (2.000) that is not supported.
  • 2.1 – The SMBv2.1 protocol that was introduced in Microsoft Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008R2.
  • 3.0 – The SMBv3.0 protocol that was introduced in Microsoft Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012.

Note too that while this option governs the protocol version used, not all features of each version are available.

So, a typical invocation to mount a Windows share accessible by all users of the machine might now look something like this:

sudo mount.cifs //WindowsIPaddress/WindowsShareName /path/to/mountpoint/ -o user=WindowsUserName,password=WindowsUserPassword,vers=3.0,uid=1000,gid=1000

(The bolded part above is all one line.)

Cronopete – An Apple Time Machine Clone For Linux

If you use Mac OS, you certainly have known about or used Time machine. It is a backup software application distributed with the Apple’s Mac OS X. It is used to backup your data to an external drive, so that you can restore them later from the backup. If you are a fan boy/girl of Time Machine, you need to check out “Cronopete”. It is the clone of Time Machine for Linux operating systems. Using Cronopete, we can easily create periodic backups of a Linux system. It supports popular Linux distributions, including Arch Linux, Debian, Fedora, and Ubuntu.

In this brief guide, we are going to see how to install and use Cronopete in Linux to backup and restore data.

Source: Cronopete – An Apple’s Time Machine Clone For Linux – OSTechNix
Related link: Easy Linux backup software with Time Machine like functionality | Nuxified.org

fkill – Interactive Tool to Kill Processes in Linux

In this guide, I’ll demonstrate how you can use fkill-cli to easily kill a process on Linux. fkill-cli is a command line tool written in Nodejs which makes process management on Linux, macOS, and Windows simpler. It provides a guided way to kill a running process with support for a search to easily filter process by name.

Source: fkill – Interactive Tool to Kill Processes in Linux (LinOxide)

How to Use Truncate Command in Linux

Welcome to our guide on how to use Truncate Command in Linux. The Linux truncate command is often used to shrink or extend the size of each FILE to the specified size. The final size of the file depends on the initial. If a FILE (for example archive or log files) is larger than the specified size, the extra data is lost, but if a FILE is shorter, it is extended and the extended part (hole) reads as zero bytes.

Source: How to Use Truncate Command in Linux (LinOxide)

How to Disable Error Report Dialog Pop-up in Ubuntu 18.04

After a fresh installation of Ubuntu desktop, applications run into problem occasionally and error reporting dialog boxes pop-up. By sending the error reports, you can help developers debugging program crashes. For those who don’t want to see the annoying pop-ups, here’s how to disable Ubuntu Apport error reporting.
Source: How to Disable Error Report Dialog Pop-up in Ubuntu 18.04 – Tips on Ubuntu

How to Exclude Specific Package from apt-get Upgrade

When working on some projects, sometimes you need the stability of your environment. Updating a package can cause the entire project to fail. Sometimes, we accidentally upgrade those packages which and this creates a serious issue on the server. This is why it can be important to maintain a specific version of a package. This article will show you how you can exclude a specific package from the upgrade on Ubuntu 16.04

Source: How to Exclude Specific Package from apt-get Upgrade (LinOxide)

How to Install Specific Version of Package using apt-get

To handle Debian-based system packages, we use the apt-get command. This command requires administrative rights to work. It contains several options that make it possible to manipulate the packages through some operations like the installation, update or deletion, and many others. The beautiful thing is the fact that it allows installing a specific version of a package […]

Source: How to Install Specific Version of Package using apt-get (LinOxide)