Category: Debian

Link: How To Add Launchpad PPAs In Debian Via `add-apt-repository` Command

“add-apt-repository” is an Ubuntu-specific script to add or remove repositories which, among others, automatically imports the public GPG key. For more information, see its man page.

You can use “add-apt-repository” in Debian to add Launchpad PPAs however, there are a few things that you should know. Read on to find out how to use “add-apt-repository” in Debian.

Full article here:
How To Add Launchpad PPAs In Debian Via `add-apt-repository` Command (Web Upd8)

Link: How to Setup a Complete Mail Server (Postfix) using ‘SquirrelMail’ (Webmail) on Ubuntu/Debian

Creating a mail server on Linux powered machines can be one of the most essential things that every system administrator needs to do while configuring his servers for the first time, if you don’t know what it means; it’s simple, if you have a website like “example.com”, you can create an email account like “username@example.com” to use it to send / receive emails easily instead of using services like Hotmail, Gmil, Yahoo Mail.. etc.

In this article, we’ll learn how to do so by installing the Postfix with “SquirrelMail” webmail application and its dependences on Debian/Ubuntu machines.

Full article here:
How to Setup a Complete Mail Server (Postfix) using ‘SquirrelMail’ (Webmail) on Ubuntu/Debian (Tecmint)

Link: Monitorix – An Open Source, Lightweight System Monitoring Tool For Linux

Monitorix is a free, Open Source monitoring tool that can be used to monitor as many services and system resources as possible. Unlike other monitoring tools, it is very simple to install, configure and monitor the systems. Initially, it was developed to support only the RPM based systems such as Red Hat, CentOS etc., but, later it is expanded its support to other distributions like Debian/Ubuntu, and BSD systems such as FreeBSD, NetBSD, and OpenBSD.

Full article here:
Monitorix – An Open Source, Lightweight System Monitoring Tool For Linux (Unixmen)

Link: Debian-goodies: A must-have Set of Utilities For Debian/Ubuntu Administrators

Are you a Debian/Ubuntu Administrator or a regular user, then you may use the dpkg and APT commands often. These commands are used to install, remove, update or upgrade a package or the whole system. Mostly, we use the above two tools only for our day to day operations, But believe me, there are many useful commands are exist that most users aware of.

If you want to know which packages occupy the most disk space, or which package might have broken another, or to get a most recent version of a package, or just to get a particular version of a package, then you probably need Debian-goodies.

Full article here:
Debian-goodies: A must-have Set of Utilities For Debian/Ubuntu Administrators (Unixmen)

Link: Finding Orphaned Packages Using Deborphan And Rpmorphan

Are you troubling with full of unused packages that occupies more space and slow down your operating system performance? Well, you should try these two awesome utilities that help will you to easily find and remove the orphaned packages on your hard drive.

Well, What is an Orphaned package? Simple, Orphaned package is an unwanted package which is no longer necessary. As you may know, whenever you install a package, it will install along with other packages(dependencies). After removing the package, not all the dependencies will be removed completely. Some dependencies might still exist and dumbs the hard drive space after removing a specified package.

In this tutorial, We will discuss how to find and remove the orphaned files in Debian, and RHEL based systems.

Full article here:
Finding Orphaned Packages Using Deborphan And Rpmorphan (Unixmen)

Link: Understanding APT, APT-Cache and Their Frequently Used Commands

If you’ve ever used Debian or a Debian based distribution like Ubuntu or Linux Mint, then chances are that you’ve used the APT package system to install or remove software. Even if you’ve never dabbled on the command line, the underlying system that powers your package manager GUI is the APT system.

Today, we are going to take a look at some familiar commands, and dive into some less or more frequently used APT commands, and shed some light on this brilliantly designed system.

Full article here:
Understanding APT, APT-Cache and Their Frequently Used Commands (Tecmint)

Link: EasyEngine – An Auto Installer Script For Managing WordPress-Nginx Websites On Ubuntu, Debian

EasyEngine (ee) is a Linux shell-script to install and manage wordpress-nginx websites in one go. Using EasyEngine, you can install Nginx, PHP, MySQL, Postfix, phpMyAdmin and their dependencies in one shot easily without the help of a System administrator. It makes very easy to install and manage wordpress-nginx websites, and you don’t have to manually install each packages and memorize all commands. Everything will be done automatically on the background. EasyEngine will work on Ubuntu LTS versions such as Ubuntu 12.04/14.04, and Debian 6/7 version. Unfortunately, there is no support for RPM based systems like CentOS, and there is no future plan to make it work on RPM based systems right now.

Full article here:
EasyEngine – An Auto Installer Script For Managing WordPress-Nginx Websites On Ubuntu, Debian (Unixmen)

The Linux equivalent of Little Snitch, ZoneAlarm, and similar per-application firewalls?

Important
This is an edited version of a post that originally appeared on a blog called The Michigan Telephone Blog, which was written by a friend before he decided to stop blogging. It is reposted with his permission. Comments dated before the year 2013 were originally posted to his blog.

EDIT: Also see OpenSnitch: The Little Snitch application like firewall tool for Linux.

If you are a Mac user, you’ve probably heard of Little Snitch.  It’s a commercial (as in, not free) program that lets you allow or deny connections to the Internet from individual applications.  One reason for using such a program is to detect software that should have no reason to connect to the Internet nevertheless attempting to do so.  For example, you download a free screensaver (dumb move to start with) and it sends all the personal information it can find on you to some group of hackers on the other side of the world.  A program like Little Snitch would let you know that the screensaver  is trying to connect to the Internet, and allow you to deny that connection.  In the Windows world, I believe that ZoneAlarm has a similar capability, and it’s also a commercial (as in, not free) program.

Leopard Flower personal firewall for Linux OS screenshot
Leopard Flower personal firewall for Linux OS screenshot

It appears that these is a similar program for Linux users, and it IS free!  It’s called Leopard Flower and it’s described as a “Personal firewall for Linux OS (based on libnetfilter_queue) which allows to allow or deny Internet access on a per-application basis rather than on a port/protocol basis.”

Looking at the screenshot it appears to have very much the same per-application blocking functionality you’d get in one of those other programs.  I have not personally tried it yet, but I wanted to create a post about it so if someday in the future I am trying to remember the name of this program, I’ll know where to find it (yes, this blog does sort of serve as my long-term memory!).  🙂

Since this article was originally published, I have been made aware of another similar application called Douane: Linux personal firewall with per application rule controls – here are a couple of screenshots:

Douane personal firewall for GNU/Linux screenshot
Douane personal firewall for GNU/Linux screenshot
Duane configurator screenshot
Duane configurator screenshot

The only downside to this one is that as of this writing the only available package is for Arch Linux but if you want to try to build it for a Ubuntu or Debian system, they provide a page showing the needed dependencies.

There is an older similar program called TuxGuardian but apparently is hasn’t been updated since 2006, so I have no idea if it will even work with current versions of Linux. And as for you Android users, try the NoRoot Firewall app.

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